Treating Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow affects more than just tennis players. Is your elbow sore, weak, or painful and not getting better?

Tennis elbow is a painful condition caused when tendons on the outside of your elbow are overused.

Despite the name, most people diagnosed with tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) don’t play tennis — however, half of all tennis players will suffer from this problem at some point during their careers.

The pain associated with tennis elbow may radiate from the outside of your elbow into your forearm and wrist. Pain and weakness may make it difficult to:

What activities can be painful and difficult if you have tennis elbow?

Who is at risk for developing tennis elbow?

When injury is caused to the muscles and tendon area around the outside of the elbow where they attach to the bone, tennis elbow can result. Usually, the dominant arm is affected, but tennis elbow can occur in the non-dominant arm, as well, or in both arms.

What are the signs and symptoms of tennis elbow?

You might have tennis elbow if you experience:

The symptoms can develop gradually.

Any activity that causes repetitive movement can cause elbow pain, but the activity generally needs to be done for more than an hour a day on many days to cause a problem. A direct blow or sudden extreme action to the elbow may also result in an injury of the tendons.

Tendons are slow to heal, so the symptoms often last for weeks to months. However, very few cases last longer than a year. We at Southwest Pain Management can help accelerate the healing.

What treatment options do you have for elbow pain?

Common treatments for these conditions are rest, ice, corticosteroid injections, regenerative treatments, and NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen.

But numerous health hazards have been linked to NSAIDs, particularly cardiovascular and gastrointestinal risks.

Here are several treatments we might suggest for tennis elbow:

Early care will usually be able to prevent pain becoming chronic or the development of a more serious disorder.

Tennis elbow affects more than just tennis players. Is your elbow sore, weak, or painful and not getting better?

Tennis elbow is a painful condition caused when tendons on the outside of your elbow are overused.

Despite the name, most people diagnosed with tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) don’t play tennis — however, half of all tennis players will suffer from this problem at some point during their careers.

The pain associated with tennis elbow may radiate from the outside of your elbow into your forearm and wrist. Pain and weakness may make it difficult to:

What activities can be painful and difficult if you have tennis elbow?

Who is at risk for developing tennis elbow?

When injury is caused to the muscles and tendon area around the outside of the elbow where they attach to the bone, tennis elbow can result. Usually, the dominant arm is affected, but tennis elbow can occur in the non-dominant arm, as well, or in both arms.

What are the signs and symptoms of tennis elbow?

You might have tennis elbow if you experience:

The symptoms can develop gradually.

Any activity that causes repetitive movement can cause elbow pain, but the activity generally needs to be done for more than an hour a day on many days to cause a problem. A direct blow or sudden extreme action to the elbow may also result in an injury of the tendons.

Tendons are slow to heal, so the symptoms often last for weeks to months. However, very few cases last longer than a year. We at Southwest Pain Management can help accelerate the healing.

What treatment options do you have for elbow pain?

Common treatments for these conditions are rest, ice, corticosteroid injections, regenerative treatments, and NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen.

But numerous health hazards have been linked to NSAIDs, particularly cardiovascular and gastrointestinal risks.

Here are several treatments we might suggest for tennis elbow:

Early care will usually be able to prevent pain becoming chronic or the development of a more serious disorder.

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